DEADLY THINGS

‘Deadly Things’ is a low-budget feature screenplay at 3rd draft stage

This contemporary drama set in a drought ravaged country town in northern New South Wales was short listed for the AFC’s Indivision Lab at an earlier draft.

It tells the story of Ken, a young motor mechanic, who returns home to attend his mother’s funeral, six months after the death of his four-year-old son, Billy, in a road accident. Ken’s bereaved, ex-partner, Adel, a cleaner, is struggling, living alone in the now empty family home. She spends most of her nights getting stoned and drunk in an attempt to evoke fleeting delirious moments of contact with her dead son. Awake, her despair transforms into an intense hatred towards Craig – the man who was driving the car and survived. The oppressive atmosphere of rural living – the heat, the cicadas – close in on Ken as he attends his mother’s funeral, fixes her car and gets drawn into Adel’s cycle of despair.

With a key theme of ‘forgiveness’ and subtextual themes of ‘retribution’ and ‘truth’, ‘Deadly Things’ presents a tantalising and powerful dramatic premise – a young man returning home to avenge his son’s death in a car accident

Reader’s reports have so far included:
‘A strong sense of colloquial dialogue – the pace, the familiarity, the tensions of small town life are deftly evoked – Great use is made of the hostile presence of the country – the deafening cicadas, the heat, the chronic water shortages.’
‘The story moves at a laconic pace. It forces focus on the mood, on the sharp naturalism of an exchange. It creates a compelling sense of grief – of characters struggling through life at a snail’s pace, barely winning the battle against a brutal, uncaring universe who has robbed them of their loved ones and hope.’
‘The issue of grief and whether you can ever get over the death of a son and the primary question: is revenge ever justified?’
‘Deadly Things’ raw emotional premise of a young man taking revenge for the death of his son promises a harrowing journey into the complexities of the human situation.’

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